PyOpenGL performance 1

The first concern about rewriting the engine in Python + OpenGL was about having to learn one more language that in the beginning I didn’t wanted to learn. The speed of OpenGL was never any worry, mainly because I trusted in the findings of Valve.

The second concern, was Python speed. Being an interpreted language, it seemed that it was going to be inherently slower that C++ or even worst, slower than C#. Working with Basic.net previously, I was accustomed to the idea of having slow code, but SharpDX is being said to be not so distant to raw C++ in speed. And it proved to be truth after my initial tests, so… What to expect from PyOpenGL?

The first test I made was to load the Stanford dragon (after converting my meshes loader to Python, with Pyassimp) and the result was not satisfactory (or so I thought): The FPS is around 40 (up to 60 without recording), wich seemed to be slow, even in my slow laptop. Still, I could not say anything yet, until making a test in ‘the big one’ and having a comparison with SharpDX. After some days, here it is:

Amazing!

PyOpenGL 2/3.1 is faster than SharpDX (DX9), just like the C++ versions. Even better, I have not made any optimization to the Python version. I’m not using PyOpenGL-Accelerate nor Cython!, so it is possible to get even better speed with those tools 😀 .

The only real difference between the two tests is the shader used, but I doubt that the impact from it is that big.

For reference, the next data:

Graphics card: Nvidia GTX 560 se

Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo 2.6GB

OS: Windows 7 32 bits

Memory: 3GB

Direct X 9 without fixed function Pipeline and shader model 2

OpenGL 2 without fixed function Pipeline and GLSL 1.2

Max FPS without recording:

– DirectX: 570 (first)

– OpenGL: 649 (second)

dx9 ogl2

Something interesting is the fact that the OpenGL app will reduce its speed if the DirectX one is running, as seen on the “Both” part of the video. Also, the OGL will slow down with any movement of any window or any interaction with the desktop. The DX window will remain steady. Does that mean that Windows gives preference to DX tasks over OGL or was it my card?

In the PyOpenGL site, they accept the wrapper being slow, but for some deprecated features, that I’m not using anyway, so I’m safe from that. And with this results and the Cython option, I’m really happy, so the conversion continues.

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